Errors in housing development story

By Derrick Knutson, associate editor

I’d like to apologize for errors in a recent story about a proposed 40-unit housing development in North Branch.

The story, “Developer Approaches NB about building multi-unit housing complex,” ran in the March 21 issue of the Post Review.

There were two errors in the story that likely caused some confusion.

One stated that the units in the proposed development would “be restricted to families with incomes at or below the area median income of $22,680.”

MWF Properties, the developers of the project, which has been dubbed “Northside Villas,” are seeking tax credits from the Minnesota Housing and Finance Agency to help offset some of the cost associated with building the development.

Income restrictions would have to be instituted in order for this project to receive the tax credits, but the dollar amount mentioned in the March 21 issue is incorrect.

A single person could make a maximum of $35,280 annually and be approved to live in the proposed development. That amount increases depending upon how many people live in a unit.

The maximum amount of rent that could be charged, according to Minnesota Housing Finance rules, is $787 per month for a one-bedroom unit and $1,091 for a three-bedroom unit.

The second incorrect statement in the story read, “The council could vote to approve or deny MWF’s proposal as soon as its April 9 meeting.”

A key bit of information was missing from that sentence. That phrase should have relayed the fact that the council could have voted to approve or deny a resolution of support for the project proposal at its April 9 meeting.

There’s still some legwork that needs to be done before the council can come to a final vote to say yea or nay on the project.

Here at the Post Review, we strive to put together a comprehensive, informative, accurate paper.

Accuracy is paramount, but errors do happen from time to time, in which case corrections are needed.

I’m never hesitant to draw attention to my mistakes in the form of a correction, or in this case, a column.

We all welcome reader feedback as well. Having the residents of this community engaged with their local paper by offering comments and pointing out the occasional error can only make it better.

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