New mayor shares goals for RC

Dan Dahlberg

Dan Dahlberg

Dan Dahlberg has some specific goals in mind for the city that elected him mayor last fall.

He shared his top visions for the community during an interview with the Post Review just prior to his first council meeting Jan. 14, when he and council member Jamie Amundson were sworn in before friends and family.

In the long-term, Dahlberg would like to see an assisted living facility in town, so folks can have the option of spending the next chapter of life in their home community.

He wants the empty buildings filled and new businesses, such as a hardware store, to open with support from the community. On how, he stressed the importance of increasing traffic flow thus making it easier and more convenient for people to get through town.

New Rush City Mayor Dan Dahlberg takes the oath of office at the Jan. 14 city council meeting. Photos by Jon Tatting

New Rush City Mayor Dan Dahlberg takes the oath of office at the Jan. 14 city council meeting. Administering the oath is City Administrator Amy Mell. Photos by Jon Tatting

“We have to find a way to lure them in,” said Dahlberg of folks who may be passing by on the interstate. “Hopefully we can find our little niche. We have great existing businesses, but we need to build on it.”

Appreciative of the park downtown, he also would like to see more parks, play areas, other places of destination and trails connecting them for kids and families to visit and keep off the busy roadways. The local park board is already on top of the latter issue through its Safeways project, which aims to connect these places with a trails system.

In the short-term, Dahlberg is interested in putting some nostalgia back into old Hwy. 61 with perhaps a series of special rides for folks and even classic car enthusiasts up and down the corridor. “This could give people and tourists a new experience,” he said.

Dahlberg digs right in at his first council meeting at city hall.

Dahlberg digs right in at his first council meeting at city hall.

To accomplish this, Dahlberg noted corridor cities including Rush City could form a partnership and create some incentive for people to make the drive. Area businesses could offer gift certificates or another promotion to attract different people to each town, he offered.

“Once people walk in their door, they’ll be glad to come back,” Dahlberg envisioned.

While Rush City’s mayor admits he’s new and learning, he has come to understand that even the simplest issue on the surface can be most complex. He also believes in treating everyone fair and being consistent about it.

He described of himself, “When I do something, I don’t go about it half way. I take what I do seriously and like to be informed and up-to-date on the issues.”

As for his personal saying: “If it’s right, it’s right.”

up arrow